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May 2019 Reads for the Rest of Us

May 2019 Reads for the Rest of Us

Here's your May 2019 Reads for the Rest of Us.

Since I've begun a regular column over at Ms. Magazine, I've been posting the Reads for the Rest of Us that I am most excited about there. Reads for the Rest of Us here used to be everything I found being published by women that I could find. Over at Ms., I've shortened the list due to time and space limits. Well, you've told me that while you love the Ms. lists, you also miss my more comprehensive lists, so I have decided to reinstate them here!

They'll be a bit different from those I used to post as I won't be able to take as much time to describe them fully; I'll need to leave that to my Ms. column. Instead, I'll just compile a quick and dirty list of covers with links for you to browse! So here's May's list!

Let me know what you think in the comments below. What are you reading this month?

May 1

Tags: Girls, Japan, literature, media

May 1

Tags: LGBTQ, queer, Minnesota, short stories, poetry

May 1

Tags: Poetry, Middle Eastern, women writers, violence

May 2

Tags: Women writers, fatphobia, memoir, humor

May 3

Tags: Climate change, women writers, policy

May 3

Tags: Literary criticism, women writers, Caribbean, music

May 4

Tags: Women writers, history, Canada, essays

May 7

Tags: Women writers, parenthood, friendships, debut

May 7

Tags: History, women writers, financial, business, African American

May 7

Tags: Lesbian, women writers, YA, thriller, vampire

May 7

Tags: Graphic novels, women writers, LGBTQ, harassment

May 7

Tags: Women writers, race, African American, fatphobia, embodiment, history

May 7

Tags: YA, mental illness, LGBTQ, loss, women writers

May 7

Tags: Historical fiction, family, women writers, Japan, literary

May 7

Tags: Technology, Indigenous, Central America, essays, women writers

May 7

Tags: YA, LGBTQ, debut, humor, women writers, romance

May 7

Tags: LGBTQ, women writers, romance, graphic novel

May 7

Tags: Africa, women writers, essays, literary

May 7

Tags: Memoir, music, women writers

May 7

Tags: Fantasy, Latinx, women writers, trilogy, YA, action

May 7

Tags: Immigration, India, women writers, family, contemporary

May 7

Tags: Romance, women writers, YA, music, humor

May 7

Tags: Women writers, Asian American, romance, contemporary

May 7

Tags: Debut, immigration, Alaska, family, rural, Asian American, Taiwan

May 7

Tags: YA, family, coming of age, parenthood, Latinx

May 10

Tags: History, African American, essays, race, women writers, anthropology

May 12

Tags: LGBTQ, India, women writers, sex work, feminism

May 14

Tags: Print culture, African American, essays, women writers

May 14

Tags: YA, coming of age, romance, women writers, Latinx, humor

May 14

Tags: Debut, China, Asian American, short stories, women writers, immigration

May 14

Tags: Poetry, women writers, race, violence, parenthood, Asian American

May 14

Tags: Poetry, US debut, LGBTQ, Spanish, love

May 14

Tags: Indigenous, community, women writers, futurity

May 14

Tags: Debut, women writers, fantasy, YA, romance

May 14

Tags: YA, romance, humor, women writers, Indian American

May 14

Tags: Fantasy, women writers, YA

May 14

Tags: Thrillers, fantasy, women writers, YA, Own Voices, loss

May 15

Tags: Indigenous, women writers, storytelling, research

May 21

Tags: Lesbian, women writers, romance, contemporary

May 21

Tags: Sports, women writers, Latinx, history

May 21

Tags: Lesbian, women writers, mystery, LGBTQ

May 21

Tags: YA, romance, women writers, LGBTQ, humor

May 21

Tags: LGBTQ, women writers, YA, family, coming of age

May 21

Tags: YA, music, violence, women writers

May 21

Tags: Plays, women writers, African American, social justice

May 21

Tags: Literary, women writers, debut, race, mystery, African American

May 21

Tags: Literary criticism, children's literature, women writers, Afrofuturism, fantasy

May 21

Tags: Transgender, feminism, women writers, politics

May 21

Tags: Lesbian, romantic, feminism, YA, women writers, harassment, humor

https://amzn.to/2VeY38q

May 24

Tags: Hinduism, women writers, India, technology, history, religion

May 28

Tags: Japan, romance, humor, women writers, YA

May 28

Tags: Siblings, loss, YA, women writers

May 28

Tags: Debut, women writers, LGBTQ, mystery, thriller, romance, YA

May 28

Tags: History, African American, women writers, race, economics

New Reads for the Rest of Us for April 2019

New Reads for the Rest of Us – April 2019

Here are your New Reads for the Rest of Us for April 2019!

Since I've begun a regular column over at Ms. Magazine, I've been posting the Reads for the Rest of Us that I am most excited about there. Reads for the Rest of Us here used to be everything I found being published by women that I could find. Over at Ms., I've shortened the list due to time and space limits. Well, you've told me that while you love the Ms. lists, you also miss my more comprehensive lists, so I have decided to reinstate them here!

They'll be a bit different from those I used to post as I won't be able to take as much time to describe them fully; I'll need to leave that to my Ms. column. Instead, I'll just compile a quick and dirty list of covers with links for you to browse! So let's try this out for April and see how it goes! Let me know what you think in the comments below.

April 1

Tags: Women writers, queer, intersex, health

April 1

Tags: Women writers, labor, procreation, feminism

April 1

Tags: Feminism, women writers, Mexico, art

April 1

Tags: LGBTQ, women writers, poetry

April 2

Tags: Debut, women writers, Latinx, short stories, Indigenous

April 2

Tags: Debut, Peru, women writers, immigration, family

April 2

Tags: Women writers, Philippines, memoir, immigration, health

April 2

Tags: Women writers, Black women, lifestyle, essays, memoir

April 2

Tags: Trafficking, women writers, violence, memoir

April 2

Tags: Transgender, women writers, humor, memoir

April 2

Tags: Women writers, environmentalism, Native American, Indigenous

April 2

Tags: Women writers, Black women, parenthood, feminism

April 2

Tags: Women writers, queer, feminism, Latinx, memoir

April 2

Tags: LGBTQ, women writers, literary fiction, historical fiction

April 2

Tags: Poetry, women writers, LGBTQ, Asian American

April 2

Tags: Women writers, politics, memoir

April 2

Tags: Native American, women writers, family

April 5

Tags: Innu, Indigenous, women writers, memoir, activism

April 9

Tags: Women writers, LGBTQ, mythology

April 9

Tags: Debut, Palestine, historical fiction, women writers

April 9

Tags: Women writers, Black women, mystery, thriller

April 9

Tags: Women writers, coming of age, romance, contemporary

April 9

Tags: Argentina, women writers, art, urban

April 9

Tags: Women writers, LGBTQ, feminism, leadership

April 9

Tags: Transgender, memoir, essays

April 9

Tags: Women writers, YA, China, fantasy, debut

April 10

Tags: Cuba, history, essays, AfroCuban

April 16

Tags: Women writers, LGBTQ, YA, romance

April 16

Tags: Women writers, debut, family, Korea, literary

April 16

Tags: Women writers, Africa, essays, history

April 16

Tags: Women writers, lesbian, romance

April 16

Tags: Lesbian, romance, women writers

April 16

Tags: Lesbian, women writers, science fiction

April 16

Tags: Lesbian, women writers, romance

April 16

Tags: Women writers, lesbian, romance

April 16

Tags: Lesbian, romance, women writers

April 16

Tags: Puerto Rico, women writers, criminal justice, history

April 16

Tags: Magical realism, Spain, Argentina, women writers

April 16

Tags: Women writers, poetry, Palestine, Israel

April 16

Tags: Poetry, literary criticism, women writers

April 16

Tags: Mexico, women writers, historical fiction, family, rural, literary fiction

April 16

Tags: Latinx, food insecurity, women writers, labor

April 16

Tags: Women writers, Bangladesh, labor

April 16

Tags: Historical fiction, Sudan, women writers

April 16

Tags: Women writers, lesbian, thriller

April 16

Tags: LGBTQ, Afrofuturism, speculative, arts

April 16

Tags: Women writers, Colombia, family, memoir

April 16

Tags: Women writers, short stories, Thailand, politics, rural

April 23

Tags: Lesbian, romance, women writers

April 23

Tags: Women writers, Palestine, law, history

April 23

Tags: Women writers, lesbian, romance

April 23

Tags: Lesbian, women writers, romance, contemporary fiction

April 23

Tags: LGBTQ, magical realism, literary fiction

April 30

Tags: Women writers, graphic novel, science fiction, debut

April 30

Tags: Women writers, India, family

April 30

Tags: Women writers, Paris, Turkey, coming of age, literary fiction, family

April 30

Tags: Women writers, graphic novel, debut, queer, contemporary fiction, literary fiction

April 30

Tags: Women writers, Uganda, Britain, short stories, literary fiction

April 30

Tags: Women writers, Islam, romance, prejudice, multiple sclerosis

April 30

Tags: Women writers, art, Mexico, history, letters

This post contains affiliate links. If you click on the links above and purchase an item, I receive a small commission. This in no way raises your cost for the item. Many thanks for your support. 

New Reads for the Rest of Us for December 2018

New Reads for the Rest of Us for December 2018

Welcome to New Reads for the Rest of Us for December 2018!

With these monthly lists, I aim to amplify the books written by those who are historically underrepresented including, but not limited to: womxn, women of color, women from the Global South, women who are Black, Indigenous, dis/abled, queer, fat, immigrants, Muslim, sex-positive, and more. My lists meant to be intersectional, feminist, and trans-inclusive. I also want to highlight books by gender non-conforming people (who may or may not be described by the term “womxn”).

If you’d like to learn more about which books I focus on, see my Review Policy. These are just guidelines and I reserve the right to include (or not!) any books I see fit. I usually add to this list as I learn of others; if you have a suggestion, please share it in the comments below!

So here are the New Reads for the Rest of Us for December 2018. There are so many great titles here, which will you read??

Islamophobia, Race, and Global Politics by Nazia Kazi (@NaziaKaziTweets)

December 1 (Kindle)

Tags: Islam, women writers

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 168 pages

Nazia Kazi’s Islamophobia, Race, and Global Politics is a devastating critique of the prevailing ways that Americans talk about Muslims, especially liberals who apparently mean well. Kazi makes her case elegantly and persuasively; her frustration is palpable and engaging. Anyone who thinks they have something worthwhile to say about Islamophobia in the United States should read this book first.–Arun Kundnani, New York University

Revolutionary Masculinity and Racial Inequality: Gendering War and Politics in Cuba by Bonnie A. Lucero

December 1

Tags: Masculinity, Cuba, politics, gender, war

University of New Mexico Press, 360 pages

“One of the most paradoxical aspects of Cuban history is the coexistence of national myths of racial harmony with lived experiences of racial inequality. Here a historian addresses this issue by examining the ways soldiers and politicians coded their discussions of race in ideas of masculinity during Cuba’s transition from colony to republic.”–Description

Tides of Revolution: Information, Insurgencies, and the Crisis of Colonial Rule in Venezuela by Cristina Soriano

December 1

Tags: Venezuela, women writers, colonialism, nonfiction

University of New Mexico Press, 336 pages

“This is a book about the links between politics and literacy, and about how radical ideas spread in a world without printing presses. In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Spanish colonial governments tried to keep revolution out of their provinces.”–Description

Decolonizing Academia: Poverty, Oppression and Pain by Clelia O. Rodríguez

December 3

Tags: Education, women writers, colonialism

Fernwood Books Ltd, 150 pages

“Poetic, confrontational and radical, Decolonizing Academia speaks to those who have been taught to doubt themselves because of the politics of censorship, violence and silence that sustain the Ivory Tower. Clelia O. Rodríguez illustrates how academia is a racialized structure that erases the voices of people of colour, particularly women.”–Description

International Surrogacy as Disruptive Industry in Southeast Asia by Andrea Whittaker

December 3

Tags: SE Asia, health, reproductive freedom, women writers

Rutgers Univ Press, 244 pages

“An original, comprehensive, and eye-opening account of the unprecedented growth of commercial surrogacy in Southeast Asia. By focusing on the industry’s multiple stakeholders—particularly Thai surrogates who have gestated babies for Australian intended parents—Whittaker writes with ethnographic sensitivity and compassion, while at the same time critiquing the “disruptive industry” within which surrogacy takes place.  A must-read for those interested in globalization, biotechnology, and reproductive justice.”–Marcia Inhorn author of Cosmopolitan Conceptions: IVF Sojourns in Global Dubai
December 4
Tags: Short stories, women writers, family, historical fiction
Counterpoint, 448 pages
“A young German Jewish refugee in England in the 1940s, a resident of India for two dozen years, and a New Yorker from the mid-1970s until her death in 2013, Jhabvala triangulated her three adopted cultures in the 17 enthralling stories gathered in this sterling retrospective collection.  . . . Jhabvala was a spellbinding short story writer of fluid empathy, exceptional cross-cultural insight, and abiding respect for unconventional love . . . This is a richly captivating, revelatory, and important collection.”–Booklist (starred review)

 

Feminist Accountability: Disrupting Violence and Transforming Power by Ann Russo

December 4

Tags: Feminism, women writers

NYU Press, 280 pages

“As a feminist organizer, I’ve been waiting for this collection of essays for years. How do we address and transform violence in non-punitive ways? Ann Russo offers a compelling analysis of how a praxis of accountability can guide us toward some answers to this question. As a scholar-activist, Russo’s insights are drawn from both theory and practice. She has tried on and tried out the ideas she espouses in community with others. The essays are beautifully written and accessible to all. Feminist Accountability is a must read for anyone interested in community accountability practices, anti-violence organizing and transformative justice.”–Mariame Kaba, Founder of Project NIA

I’m Gonna Make You Love Me by Tracey Richardson (@trich7117)

December 4

Tags: Lesbian, romance

Bella Books, 250 pages

“Ellie Kirkland is at loose ends―and not for the first time. Resistant to following the path her parents insist on, she’s been trying out careers like she’s trying on outfits at Banana Republic. Now that her dream of being a journalist is over, Ellie must begin again. And the woman who crushed that very dream is the very woman who just might hold the key to Ellie’s future.”–Description

Revolution Sunday by Wendy Guerra and Achy Obejas (Translator)

December 4

Tags: Cuba, women writers, thriller, Latinx

Melville House, 208 pages

“Arresting, an explosive portrait of loneliness and isolation. Thick with the atmosphere of… Havana on the cusp of the Cuban thaw, the novel reads like the world’s most poetic anxiety dream, vibrant and stifling. Demanding and unforgettable.”–Kirkus (starred)

Where There’s a Will by Virginia Hale

December 4

Tags: Lesbian, romance

Bella Books, 276 pages

“As their friendship blossoms, Beth’s unspoken desire to sell remains the single wedge keeping them apart. Will asking for what she needs cost Beth a chance at a life with Dylan? Perhaps the richest inheritance of all may be a second chance.”–Description

Graceful Woman Warrior: A Story of Mindfully Living In The Face Of Dying by Terri Luanna da Silva with Laurie O’Neil and Marisa Alegria da Silva

December 5

Tags: Health, death, women writers, memoir

“Diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer at 37, artist Terri Luanna da Silva’s example of living and dying with grace and integrity is an inspiration-not only for the dying, but for anyone aspiring to live with greater mindfulness and authenticity.”–Lauren Mackler, best-selling author of Solemate: Master the Art of Aloneness & Transform Your Life

Postfeminist War: Women in the Media-Military-Industrial Complex by Mary Douglas Vavrus

December 10

Tags: Military, feminism, women writers

Rutgers Univ Press, 256 pages

“That women are increasingly on the front lines of war since 9/11 may not surprise readers of this book, but the many ways that women are symbolically enlisted in the promotion and perpetuation of endless global conflict certainly will. This well-written and timely book is essential for students and scholars alike to understand the PR strategies employed to curry favor for war, even as the public sours on American militarism. Unveiling the constructions and contradictions of a kinder, gentler post-feminist war mythology offers all of us a pathway to become ethical witnesses to war narratives, in the hope of ending war and its inhumane consequences.”–Robin Andersen author of A Century of Media: A Century of War

Fire on the Water: Sailors, Slaves, and Insurrection in Early American Literature, 1789-1886 by Lenora Warren (@Lenora_DW)

December 14

Tags: History, literary criticism, women writers

Bucknell University Press, 170 pages

“The book’s topic is superb: the role of black sailors, particularly enslaved or emancipated black sailors, has been woefully understudied. In locating both revolutionary potential and abolitionist inspiration in the insurrectionary activity of black sailors, Warren provides a fresh, exciting new unit of analysis for scholars and students of American literary history. I cannot stress enough how vital and necessary the topic is, and how overlooked it has been.”–Hester Blum, Pennsylvania State University and President of the Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists)

Liberating Hollywood: Women Directors and the Feminist Reform of 1970s American Cinema by Maya Montañez Smukler

December 14

Tags: Feminism, film, US history

Rutgers Univ Press, 275 pages

“A counterintuitive feminist history of the new Hollywood that convincingly challenges widely held assumptions about the boys’ club movie brat auteur renaissance. In Liberating Hollywood, Maya Montanez Smukler is remarkably attentive to the industrial as well as sociopolitical histories that made such a new women’s cinema and such a suddenly liberated Hollywood possible.”–Jon Lewis, author of Hard-Boiled Hollywood: Crime and Punishment in Postwar Los Angeles

Modern Spanish Women as Agents of Change: Essays in Honor of Maryellen Bieder edited by Jennifer Smith

December 14

Tags: Spain, history

Bucknell University Press, 248 pages

“This book is a beautiful tribute to Maryellen Bieder, an important and significant scholar of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Spanish narrative by women. The essays in this book—by scholars and writers of several different generations who are also highly esteemed in the same and other areas—expand and continue Bieder’s research to new horizons.”–Sandra J. Schumm author of Mother and Myth in Spanish Novels

African Immigrant Families in the United States: Transnational Lives and Schooling by Serah Shani

December 15

Tags: Africa, Ghana, immigration, women writers, education

Lexington Books, 186 pages

“This beautifully written book elucidates the educational trajectories of immigrant children as they confront rigid American systems of race and class, and it documents how parents rely on the ‘network village,’ a transnational network of fellow Ghanaians in New York and Ghana, to provide academic and other types of support and resources for their children. This superb ethnography will appeal to readers interested in immigration and education, anthropology of education, and African diaspora cultural studies.–Lesley Bartlett, University of Wisconsin

Afro-Asian Connections in Latin America and the Caribbean by Luisa Marcela Ossa, Debbie Lee-DiStefano

December 15

Tags: Latinx, Caribbean, Asia, Africa, essays

“The essays collected this book by Ossa and Lee-Distefano present a formidable addition to Latin American, African, and Asian studies—where the fields converge in vigorous and well-researched conversation with one another.”–Sheridan Wigginton, California Lutheran University

Brooklyn On My Mind: Black Visual Artists from the WPA to the Present by Myrah Brown Green 

December 15

Tags: Art, women writers, New York, US history

Schiffer, 272 pages

“This new resource assembles 129 Black artists and their magnificent works, highlighting their important contributions to art worldwide. Beginning with the Brooklyn-based artists active during the Works Progress Administration years and continuing with artists approaching their prime today, the collection spans 80 years of art. From highly publicized artists to rising talent, each is tied to Brooklyn in their own way.”–Description

Crime and Violence in the Caribbean: Lessons from Jamaica by Sherill V. Morris-Francis, Camille A. Gibson, Lorna E. Grant

December 15

Tags: Caribbean, violence, women writers, essays

Lexington Books, 256 pages

“This book provides an excellent historical overview of crime and violence in the Caribbean. The contributors identify and present many of the forces that contribute to this phenomenon.”–Zelma Henriques, John Jay College

Gender and Environment in Science Fiction by Bridgitte Barclay, Christy Tidwell

December 15

Tags: Science fiction, gender, environment

“This book delivers shrewd analyses of a wonderful and quirky range of SF texts. Barclay and Tidwell situate the project brilliantly, and the collection as a whole will illuminate familiar texts anew and add unfamiliar stories to your high-priority reading and screening queues.”–Andrew Hageman, Luther College

Pan African Spaces: Essays on Black Transnationalism by Msia Kibona Clark (@kibona), Loy Azalia (@LoyAzalia), Phiwokuhle Mnyandu (@DrMnyandu)

December 15

Tags: Essays, women writers, #OwnVoices, Africa, African American

Lexington Books, 316 pages

“The essays [in this book] represent a wide spectrum of experiences and viewpoints central to the bicultural Africans/Black experience. The contributors offer poignant and grounded perspectives on the diverse ways race, ethnicity, and culture are experienced, debated, and represented. All of the chapters contribute more broadly to writings on dual identities, and the various ways bicultural Africans/Blacks navigate their identities and their places in African and Diaspora communities.”–Description

The Question of Class in Contemporary Latin American Cinema by María Mercedes Vázquez Vázquez

December 15

Tags: Latinx, women writers, film, class

Lexington Books, 222 pages

“This book offers a theoretically rich survey of directors and films that found international notoriety as well as those that have been little known outside Latin America. It examines the history, institutions, contexts, and practices that have reshaped Latin American cinema under neoliberalism, and it does so in an impressive, intellectually rigorous manner.”–Cacilda M. Rêgo, Utah State University

Twentieth Century Forcible Child Transfers: Probing the Boundaries of the Genocide Convention by Ruth Amir

December 15

Tags: Women writers, family

Lexington Books, 308 pages

“A well-researched report about the horror of ‘legal’ child abduction by the state, which deems itself the savior that will elevate the children of what it deems inferior cultures to it’s notion of ‘civilized’ heights. Slay their children, or rob them of their cultural heritage by removal, the end result is genocide!”–Daniel N. Paul, Mi’kmaw Elder

Women of the 2016 Election: Voices, Views, and Values edited by Jennifer Schenk Sacco

December 15

Tags: Politics, women writers, essays

Lexington Books, 246 pages

“This fascinating collection of essays provides a rich overview of women’s multiple and diverse contributions to U.S. presidential campaigns. The book’s focus on individual women with prominent roles in the 2016 election reflects an innovative approach that illustrates superbly the complicated and varied ways that gender is at play in contemporary electoral politics.”–Susan J. Carroll, co-author of A Seat at the Table: Congresswomen’s Perspectives on Why Their Presence Matters, Rutgers University

Women, Social Change, and Activism: Then and Now by Dawn Hutchinson, Lori Underwood

December 15

Tags: Activism, essays, women writers

Lexington Books, 110 pages

“Through the study of local and global activism, Women, Social Change and Activism: Then and Now engages scholars interested in the artistic, economic, educational, ethical, historical, literary, philosophical, political, psychological, religious, and social dimensions of women’s lives and resistance.”–Description

The Kingdom and the Republic: Sovereign Hawai’i and the Early United States by Noelani Arista (@Noeolali)

December 17

Tags: Hawaiʻi, politics, US history, women writers, Native American

University of Pennsylvania Press, 312 pages

The Kingdom and the Republic challenges some of our most basic assumptions about native Hawaiʻi, the encounters between natives and foreigners, and the processes of colonization, upending our expectations of who, in Hawaiʻi, had law and governance, and who was encountering whom.”–Rebecca McLennan, University of California, Berkeley

One-Dimensional Queer by Roderick A. Ferguson

December 17

Tags: Queer, nonfiction, people of color

Polity, 200 pages

One-Dimensional Queer is as clear an account as you could hope to encounter of how race and sexuality came to be understood as separate formations in US history. The resultant mainstreaming of LGBT cultures has been disastrous in terms of seeing our way out of the current crisis we inhabit. Offering solutions as well as critique, Ferguson’s book is destined to be a crucial part of any library of liberation.”–Jack Halberstam, Columbia University

29 Dates by Melissa de la Cruz (@MelissadelaCruz)

December 18

Tags: Romance, women writers, humor

Inkyard Press, 400 pages

“A refreshingly modern love story, 29 Dates serves up a funny and heartfelt rom-com about finding love and figuring out life on your own terms.”–Maurene Goo, author of I Believe in a Thing Called Love

Dear Heartbreak: YA Authors and Teens on the Dark Side of Love by Heather Demetrios (@HDemetrios)

December 18

Tags: YA, essays, relationships

Henry Holt and Co., 256 pages

“Eighteen young adult novelists . . . respond to letters from real teenagers in this timeless and breathtakingly honest collection.”–Booklist, starred review

“A masterful combination of painful honesty, gentle encouragement, and irreverent humor.”–Kirkus Reviews

The Disasters by MK England (@GeektasticLib)

December 18

Tags: Queer, YA, sci fi, debut, #OwnVoices

Harper Teen, 368 pages

“Much to recommend: nonstop cinematic action, strong feminist messages, and great diversity of characters.”–ALA Booklist

“An action-packed, entertaining blend of space hijinks, humor, and romance.”–Kirkus Reviews

Hunting Annabelle by Wendy Heard (@wendydheard)

December 18

Tags: Debut, thriller, women writers

MIRA, 304 pages

“This dark, gritty thriller keeps the pages turning, making this a solid pick for readers who enjoy a trip through an unstable mind, such as in Caroline Kepnes’s You.”–Library Journal

Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal by Alexandra Natapoff (@ANatapoff)

December 31

Tags: Women writers, criminal justice

Basic Books, 352 pages

“This important book completely upends the criminal justice conversation. Natapoff documents dark truths about the misdemeanor process-how it forces the innocent to plead guilty, how it disregards basic legal rights, and how it inflicts deep injustice. Her insights inspire both outrage and innovation. Punishment Without Crime provides a terrific new understanding of a flawed criminal system, and it offers a much-needed path toward the fair and just criminal system America deserves. A necessary book for our times.”–Barry Scheck, cofounder of the Innocence Project

I’ll add more titles as I find them. What are you reading this month??

This post contains affiliate links.

New Books By Women May

New Books by WOC, QTBIPOC, GNC, and more – May 2018 Releases

Need a new book for May?
Here’s a roundup of the new books being released in May that I am most excited about, by and/or about women of color, LBTQ+ women, women with disabilities, gender non-conforming people, feminists, and womxn from other historically underrepresented and underserved communities.
If you are curious about which books I focus on, see my Review Policy. These are just guidelines and I reserve the right to include (or not!) any books I see fit.
I’ll probably add to this list as I learn of others; if you have a suggestion, please place it in the comments below!

 

Awus Story by Justine MintsaAwu’s Story by Justine Mintsa and Cheryl Toman (Translator)

May 1

“At the dawn of the twenty-first century, villages in the Fang region of northern Gabon must grapple with the clash of tradition and the evolution of customs throughout modern Africa. With this tension in the background, the passionate, deft, and creative seamstress Awu marries Obame, after he and his beloved wife, Bella, have been unable to conceive. Because all three are reluctant participants in this arrangement, theirs is an emotionally fraught existence. Through heartbreaking and disastrous events, Awu grapples with long-standing Fang customs that counter her desire to take full control of her life and home.

Supplemented with a foreword and critical introduction highlighting Justine Mintsa’s importance in African literature, Awu’s Story is an essential work of African women’s writing and the only published work to meditate this deeply on some of the Fang’s most cherished legends and oral history.”–Amazon

 

Gaming Masculinity by Megan CondisGaming Masculinity: Trolls, Fake Geeks, and the Gendered Battle for Online Culture by Megan Condis

May 1

“Megan Condis addresses the most important and contentious controversies in gaming culture at present. Her writing argues strongly against the groups who have tried to undermine the diversity arising in games and provides a passionate insight into these events, linking them with wider cultural shifts in Western society.”–Esther MacCallum-Stewart, Staffordshire University
“Fierce, fun, and fascinating. Condis writes with a journalist’s ear and an academic’s eye, getting to the core of what drives men’s behavior online, in games, and throughout digital culture.” –Derek A. Burrill, author, Die Tryin’: Videogames, Masculinity, Culture

 

 

ISAN by Mary TingISAN: International Sensory Assassin Network by Mary Ting (@MaryTing)

May 1

“The world has changed. Scientists warned it would happen.

Meteors devastated the Earth. World Governments developed plans to help surviving citizens. The United States disbanded and salvageable land was divided into four quadrants—North, South, East, and West—governed by The Remnant Council.

Struggling to survive, seventeen-year-old Ava ends up in juvenile detention, until she is selected for a new life—with a catch. She must be injected with an experimental serum. The results will be life changing. The serum will make her better. To receive the serum Ava agrees to join a program controlled by ISAN, the International Sensory Assassin Network.”–description

 

Life After Darkness by Michelle KnightLife After Darkness: Finding Healing and Happiness After the Cleveland Kidnappings by Michelle Knight (@LilyRoseLee1)

May 1

“From Michelle Knight-Cleveland kidnapping survivor and #1 NYT bestselling author of Finding Me-comes an inspirational book about healing and resilience, on the five-year anniversary of her escape.”–Amazon

“The story of an incredibly brave and resilient young woman and of a spirit that refused to be crushed, even through the worst time.”–The Daily Mail

 

 

Little Fish by Casey PlettLittle Fish by Casey Plett (@caseyplett)

May 1

“I have never felt as seen, understood, or spoken to as I did when I read Little Fish. Never before in my life. Casey remains one of THE authors to read if you want to understand the interior lives of trans women in this century.”–Meredith Russo, author of If I Was Your Girl

“There is a dark place most novels don’t touch. If you’ve ever been there, maybe you know how exhilarating it can be to read a book like this, a book that captures the darkness so honestly, so accurately, that you can finally begin to let it go. Fearless and messy and oozing with love, Little Fish is a devastating book that I don’t ever want to be without.”–Zoey Leigh Peterson, author of Next Year, For Sure

 

Map of Salt and Stars by Jennifer Zeynab JoukhadarThe Map of Salt and Stars by Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar (@JenniferZeynab)

May 1

“Nour’s family constantly endures hardship. . . but her young, honest voice adds a softer, coming-of-age perspective to this story of loss, hope, and survival. . . This imaginative yet very real look into war-torn Syria is a must.”–Booklist, starred review

“Debut novelist Joukhadar gracefully balances the gritty, often horrific truth of the refugee’s plight with the lyrical near-fairy tale she has created….A wise, vibrantly told story for a wide range of readers, particularly relevant now.”–Library Journal

 

 

Mars Room by Rachel KushnerThe Mars Room: A Novel by Rachel Kushner

May 1

“In smart, determined, and vigilant Romy, Kushner, an acclaimed writer of exhilarating skills, has created a seductive narrator of tigerish intensity… This is a gorgeously eviscerating novel of incarceration writ large…Rooted in deeply inquisitive thinking and executed with artistry and edgy wit, Kushner’s dramatic and disquieting novel investigates with verve and compassion societal strictures and how very difficult it is to understand each other and to be truly free.”–Booklist, Starred Review

“A searing look at life on the margins…This is, fundamentally, a novel about poverty and how our structures of power do not work for the poor, and Kushner does not flinch…gripping.”–Kirkus Reviews

 

Monsoon Mansion by Cinelle BarnesMonsoon Mansion: A Memoir by Cinelle Barnes

May 1

“In this incandescent debut memoir, Cinelle Barnes forges memories of her family’s downfall with tumultuous Filipino history. Like the storm in its title, Monsoon Mansion immerses us in the darkest waters of memory, stirring up unbearably brutal childhood events with lyrical prose and searing imagery, forming a woven tale that is both delicate and electric. This book assures us that even when we lose those things that give shape to our humanity—our roots, culture, and family—we can go on to devise a new way of being.”–Susan Tekulve, author of In the Garden of Stone

I just finished this book and if you like creative non-fiction and memoirs, you would enjoy this one. More complete review coming soon!

 

Motherhood by Sheila HetiMotherhood by Sheila Heti (@sheilaheti)

May 1

“This inquiry into the modern woman’s moral, social and psychological relationship to procreation is an illumination, a provocation, and a response―finally―to the new norms of femininity, formulated from the deepest reaches of female intellectual authority. It is unlike anything else I’ve read. Sheila Heti has broken new ground, both in her maturity as an artist and in the possibilities of the female discourse itself.”–Rachel Cusk, author of Outline and Transit

 

 

 

Not That Bad by Roxane GayNot That Bad: Dispatches From Rape Culture by Roxane Gay (ed.) (@rgay)

May 1

Edited and with an introduction by Roxane Gay, the New York Times bestselling and deeply beloved author of Bad Feminist and Hunger, this anthology of first-person essays tackles rape, assault, and harassment head-on.–Amazon

Vogue, “10 of the Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018” * Harper’s Bazaar, “10 New Books to Add to Your Reading List in 2018” * Elle, “21 Books We’re Most Excited to Read in 2018” * Boston Globe, “25 books we can’t wait to read in 2018” * Huffington Post, “60 Books We Can’t Wait to Read in 2018” * Hello Giggles, “19 Books We Can’t Wait to Read in 2018” * Buzzfeed, “33 Most Exciting New Books of 2018”

 

 

Political Risk by Condoleezza RicePolitical Risk: How Businesses and Organizations Can Anticipate Global Insecurity by Condoleezza Rice (@CondoleezzaRiceand Amy B. Zegart

May 1

“From New York Times bestselling author and former U.S. secretary of state Condoleezza Rice and Stanford University professor Amy B. Zegart comes an examination of the rapidly evolving state of political risk, and how to navigate it.”–Amazon

“Clearly written and timely, this book will interest not only current and future business executives but also would-be-whistle-blowers and corporate watchdogs.”–Publishers Weekly

 

 

Poppy War by RF KuangThe Poppy War by R.F. Kuang (@kuangrf)

May 1

“Debut novelist Kuang creates an ambitious fantasy reimagining of Asian history populated by martial artists, philosopher-generals, and gods […] This is a strong and dramatic launch to Kuang’s career.”–Publishers Weekly

“I have no doubt this will end up being the best fantasy debut of the year […] I have absolutely no doubt that [Kuang’s] name will be up there with the likes of Robin Hobb and N.K. Jemisin.” — Booknest

 

 

 

Seasons of My Mother by Marcia Gay HardenThe Seasons of My Mother: A Memoir of Love, Family, and Flowers by Marcia Gay Harden (@MGH_8)

May 1

“A fiercely loving and tender tribute to Marcia Gay Harden’s mother, remembering for her and for us what Alzheimer’s has stolen, filling those darkened holes with compassion, acceptance, beauty, and love. I savored every page and didn’t want it to end.–Lisa Genova, New York Times bestselling author of Still Alice and Every Note Played

“Poignant, beautiful . . . . Replete with emotionally resonant scenes, humor, and tales of Harden’s own journey as an actor, The Seasons of My Mother is both inspirational and devastating, a touching tribute to a remarkable woman.”–Booklist

 

 

Song of Blood and Stone by L PenelopeSong of Blood & Stone: Earthsinger Chronicles, Book One by L. Penelope (@leslyepenelope)

May 1

“L. Penelope’s page-turning apocalyptic epic Song of Blood & Stone does what fantasy does best: provide epic plots, epic world-building and epic myth. A rewarding, carefully crafted read.”–The Root

“Penelope delivers an engrossing story with delightful characters in this fantastic opening to a promising series.”–Publishers Weekly starred review

 

 

 

Strut by Mariahadessa Ekere TallieStrut by Mariahadessa Ekere Tallie (@SageEkere)

May 1

Book description: Strut, Mariahadessa Ekere Tallie’s second book of poetry (her first was Karma’s Footsteps), emerges from an intense engagement with contemporary issues of crucial importance in our historical moment—ranging from global warming, genocide, capitalism, and racism to sexism, slut-shaming, slavery, and mental illness—in creative ways that facilitate dialogue.This is a work about struggle, survival, injustice, transcendence, and love. Strut explores themes of ancestry, survival, sensuality, and acceptance of self. This book celebrates the gorgeousness of life even as it bears witness to the ugliness that accompanies, and often seems to permeate, the human experience.

 

 

Tiffany Sly Lives Here Now by Dana L DavisTiffany Sly Lives Here Now by Dana L. Davis (@DanaLDavis)

May 1

“Debut author Davis takes an unflinching approach to racism, religion, emotional abuse, and mental illness. Tiffany’s circumstances are nightmarish, but the narrative isn’t weighed down, in large part because of her integrity, passion, and refusal to be self-pitying.”–Publishers Weekly

“Davis’ debut novel is an honest, funny, and captivating examination of race, socio-economics, mental health, and family…A dynamic and honest coming-of-age novel with universal appeal that will especially speak to black girls questioning their place in the world.”–Kirkus Reviews

 

 

Welcome to Lagos by Chibundu OnuzoWelcome to Lagos by Chibundu Onuzo (@ChibunduOnuzo)

May 1

Welcome to Lagos doesn’t just give us a glimpse of Nigeria, it transports us there. Onuzo’s storytelling is masterful, her characters are irresistible, and her voice is astounding in its subtle power. Onuzo stands on the shoulders of Chinua Achebe and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and from her perch offers her own fresh, but assured, view.” –Margaret Wilkerson Sexton, author of A Kind of Freedom

 

 

 

Self-Ish by Chloe SchwenkeSelf-Ish: A Transgender Awakening by Chloe Schwenke (@chloemaryland)

May 4

“Chloe Schwenke’s Self-ish offers an intelligent, thoughtful look at the complex journey that is gender transition, illuminating aspects of gender transition―such as the difficulties of job hunting, the process of forming and renegotiating friendships, and the intersection of trans identity and Quaker religious practice―that haven’t received much attention in memoirs or the media.”–Joy Ladin, author of Through the Door of Life: A Jewish Journey Between Genders

 

 

 

Against Memoir by Michelle TeaAgainst Memoir: Complaints, Confessions & Criticisms  by Michelle Tea (@TeaMichelle)

May 8

“The essays in Against Memoir remind us how pleasure, pain, wisdom, and delight come from the ground up, by and through the body, and in this case, a body unapologetically firing all her desires, pleasures, fears, and dreams like lightning. A hardcore delight, a queer blood song picking the scab off the skin of culture.”–Lidia Yuknavitch, author of The Book of Joan

“An entrancing collection of irreverent and flamboyant essays.”–Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

 

 

Amal Unbound by Aisha SaeedAmal Unbound by Aisha Saeed (@aishacs)

May 8

“Saeed’s timely and stirring middle-grade debut is a celebration of resistance and justice.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The compelling story of a girl’s fight to regain her life and dreams after being forced into indentured servitude.”–IndieBound

 

 

 

Barracoon by Zora Neale HurstonBarracoon by Zora Neale Hurston (Debra G. Plant, ed.)

May 8

A major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic Their Eyes Were Watching God, with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade–abducted from Africa on the last “Black Cargo” ship to arrive in the United States.

 

 

 

Lighting the Fires of Freedom by Janet Dewart BellLighting the Fires of Freedom: African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement bJanet Dewart Bell (@JanetDewartBell)

May 8

“A primer and an inspiration for anyone looking to make their mark during these times of change and uncertainty.”–Juhu Thukral, human rights lawyer and inaugural speaker, Anita Hill Lecture Series

“A must-read for anyone interested in race, gender, class, American political development, the Civil Rights Movement, and the power of social change.”–Christina M. Greer, PhD, associate professor of political science at Fordham University

 

 

Puddin by Julie MurphyPuddin’ by Julie Murphy (@andimJULIE)

May 8

“Murphy’s plot brims with unlikely friendships, irresistible romance, fabulous fat acceptance, and a kick-ass ending. Buoying.”–Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Murphy’s energetic writing style makes for compulsive readability.”–Booklist

“Julie Murphy has created the platonic love story of a lifetime. I am wildly in love with Puddin’.”–Becky Albertalli, award-winning author of Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda

 

 

Shadow Child by Rahna Reiko RizzutoShadow Child by Rahna R. Rizzuto (@r3reiko)

May 8

“A beautifully woven historical saga wrapped in a page-turning mystery, Shadow Child explores time, memory and identity,shedding new light on the lives of Japanese-Americans, and how trauma can be its own kind of inheritance. Not since Housekeeping has there been a pair of sisters so intricately linked as Hana and Kei, or settings that imprint so firmly on the mind, from the internment camps of WWII to the hidden caves and tropical waters of Hawaii. This is a stunning story of sisterhood and survival, of healing and forgiveness, and how we find our true selves in each other.”–Hannah Tinti, New York Times bestselling author of The Good Thief and The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley

“National Book Critics Circle finalist Rizzuto blends historical fiction and mystery into a haunting examination of identity and family in this perfect book club choice.”–Library Journal (starred review)

 

Undead Girl Gang by Lily AndersonUndead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson (@ms_lilyanderson)

May 8

“A compelling mystery, a grimly funny fantasy, and a genuinely touching story of friendship.”–Booklist

Undead Girl Gang is a YA mash up of ‘The Craft’ and ‘Veronica Mars’ with a Latina protagonist…the best mix of ’90s girl power culture, compelling magic and creepy circumstances—all rolled together for the best kind of murder mystery.”–Bustle.com

 

 

 

Way You Make Me Feel by Maurene GooThe Way You Make Me Feel by Maurene Goo (@maurenegoo ‏)

May 8

A Junior Library Guild selection

“With massive amounts of humor, heart, and soul, this love letter to L.A. and its diversity is a celebration of friends, family, and food trucks.”–Booklist, starred review

“Sweet, sexy, hilarious, and featuring a spectacular father-daughter relationship, this book will fly off the shelves.”–School Library Journal, starred review

 

 

My Soul Looks Back by Jessica B HarrisMy Soul Looks Back: A Memoir by Jessica B. Harris 

May 9 (hardcover), May 15 (paperback), Kindle out now

“Come for the insight into the circle of friends that first resolved around James Baldwin, then shifted orbit to revolve around Maya Angelou. Stay because you’re enraptured by the candid, passionate woman narrating from the periphery. This is an intimate look at an inner circle of Black writers, scholars, and glamazons moving through the middle of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, told with bold tenderness by a woman who grew up in their company, under their gaze.”–Alice Randall, author of Ada’s Rules and The Wind Done Gone

 

 

 

It's Only Blood by Anna DahlqvistIt’s Only Blood: Shattering the Taboo of Menstruation by Anna Dahlqvist (@AnnaDahlqvist1)

May 15 (Kindle)

“A necessary contribution to the conversation on gender liberation. Dahlqvist masterfully moves between storytelling and frameworking how stigma holds menstruators back globally, while offering tangible solutions to many of these problems. A must read.”–Kiran Gandhi, musician, activist, and free-bleeding runner at the 2015 London Marathon
“Essential reading for anyone who wants to understand and take action against the global consequences of menstrual shame, stigma, and taboo. An insightful and inspiring read that will challenge you to think and behave differently.”–Mandu Reid, founder of The Cup Effect

 

My So Called Bollywood Life by Nisha SharmaMy So-Called Bollywood Life by Nisha Sharma (@Nishawrites)

May 15

“Full of heart, culture and laughter! This sparkling story left me smiling for days.”–Roshani Chokshi, New York Times bestselling author of The Star-Touched Queen

“I could not put this book down until the very last page!”–Ellen Oh, author of The Prophecy series

“Fresh, feisty, and fun!”–Tanuja Desai Hidier, author of the critically acclaimed Born Confused and sequel Bombay Blues

 

 

The Ensemble by Aja GabelThe Ensemble by Aja Gabel (@AjaMaybe)

May 15

“Aja Gabel’s powerful debut offers a sensitive portrait of four young musicians forging their paths through life: sometimes at odds with each other, sometimes in harmony, but always inextricably linked by their shared pasts.”–Celeste Ng, New York Times bestselling author of Everything I Never Told You and Little Fires Everywhere

“Gabel explores friendship and art with great warmth, humanity, and wisdom.”–Library Journal (starred review)

“Wonderful…. The four characters are individually memorable, but as a quartet they’re unforgettable.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review)

 

Friendship As Social Justice ActivismFriendship as Social Justice Activism: Critical Solidarities in a Global Perspective by Niharika Banerjea, Debanuj Dasgupta, Rohit K. Dasgupta (eds.)

May 15

“Friendship as Social Justice Activism brings together academics and activists to have essential conversations about friendship, love, and desire as kinetics for social justice movements. The contributors featured here come from across the globe and are all involved in diverse movements, including LGBTQ rights, intimate-partner violence, addiction recovery, housing, migrant, labor, and environmental activism.”–IndieBound

 

 

 

Blame it on Bianca del Rio by Bianca del RioBlame It On Bianca del Rio: The Expert on Nothing with an Opinion on Everything by Bianca del Rio (@TheBiancaDelRio)

May 22

“Uproarious advice and never-before-seen color photos from drag queen extraordinaire Bianca Del Rio.

A collection of biting advice filled with vibrant photos from Bianca’s twisted universe, Blame It On Bianca Del Rio will shock you and keep you laughing. But be warned: it is not for the faint of heart!”–Amazon

 

 

MEM by BC MorrowMEM by Bethany C. Morrow (@BCMorrow)

May 22

Buzzfeed’s #1 Book to Read this Spring
A Best Book of the Month at The Washington Post, Bustle, and Chicago Review of Books

“Morrow’s debut is ambitious and insightful, raising questions about memory, trauma, and humanity. The novel is at its best when it presents Elsie at her most human, forcing the real ones around her to reckon with what her personhood means for theirs.”–Publishers Weekly

“In the world of Bethany C. Morrow’s imaginative and gloriously written first novel, MEM, a memory might have a life of her own. This novel imagines an alternate past where memories can be extracted and turned to flesh, a premise that unfolds with intrigue and wisdom from this writer’s fertile imagination. Don’t miss this exciting debut that will change the way you think about memories.”–Tananarive Due, American Book Award and British Fantasy Award winner

 

Mondays Not Coming by Tiffany D JacksonMonday’s Not Coming by Tiffany D. Jackson (@WriteinBK)

May 22

“This thought-provoking thriller examines issues such as abuse, gentrification, and the marginalization of people of color with nuance and sensitivity. The narrative deftly moves back and forth between past and present, building to a devastating conclusion. A spellbinding, profoundly moving choice for YA collections.”–School Library Journal (starred review)

“Jackson doesn’t hold anything back when it comes to the pain of abuse and the ramifications of turning a blind eye. It’s a frank, devastating read filled with real and flawed characters, and it’s a story that needs to be read.”–Booklist

 

 

Well That Escalated Quickly by Franchesca RamseyWell, That Escalated Quickly: Memoirs and Mistakes of an Accidental Activist by Franchesca Ramsey (@chescaleigh)

May 22

“In this sharp, funny, and timely collection of personal essays, veteran video blogger and star of MTV’s Decoded Franchesca Ramsey explores race, identity, online activism, and the downfall of real communication in the age of social media rants, trolls, and call-out wars.”–Amazon

 

 

 

 

Heroine of the Harlem RenaissanceHeroine of the Harlem Renaissance and Beyond: Gwendolyn Bennett’s Selected Writings by Belinda Wheeler (@BWheeler_PhDand Louis J. Parascandola (eds.)

May 29

“This superbly edited collection will introduce many readers to a more versatile and accomplished Gwendolyn Bennett than they have known before. It includes the unpublished political poetry that extends her range and impact, making her a key figure of the 1930s.”–Cary Nelson, author of Repression and Recovery: Modern American Poetry and the Politics of Cultural Memory, 1910-1945

 

 

 

Like a Mother by Angela GarbesLike a Mother: A Feminist Journey Through the Science and Culture of Pregnancy by Angela Garbes (@agarbes

May 29

“Angela Garbes maps the strange void at the heart of American parenting-the ways we simultaneously deify, infantilize, and erase mothers-and then pours herself into that void with indefatigable curiosity and resounding compassion. Like a Mother is a deeply-researched history of human reproduction; it is a jewel-bright memoir; it is hard science beautifully translated; it is funny; it is intersectional; it will crack you open and fill you with awe. Required reading for mothers, and double-required for everyone else.”–Lindy West, author of New York Times bestseller Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

 

 

So Close to Being the Shit by RettaSo Close to Being the Sh*t, Y’All Don’t Even Know by Retta (@unfoRETTAble)

May 29

“Reading this book is like having the best coffee date with the life-long friend I wish I had. Retta makes me laugh and feel so hard.”–America Ferrera

“This memoir is fantastic. It’s funny, it’s heartfelt, it’s insightful, and it’s charming. I liked Retta before; now I’m her biggest fan.”–Bookriot

Retta’s unique voice and refreshing honesty will make you laugh, cry, and laugh so hard you cry.”–Bustle

 

 

Wind in My Hair by Masih AlinejadThe Wind in My Hair: My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran by Masih Alinejad (@AlinejadMasih)

May 29

“Women all over Iran risked imprisonment and even their lives and safety to post pictures. Alinejad’s stories of her illustrious career as a groundbreaking journalist challenging the Islamic Republic make for a fascinating narrative.”–Publisher’s Weekly

“[Masih’s] descriptions of life as a journalist and activist will captivate readers interested in Iran, international affairs, gender equality, and human rights.”–Booklist

 

As You Like It, Volume II of the Gerald Kraak Anthology: African Perspectives on Gender, Social Justice and Sexuality
May
Tags: Africa, LGBTQ, queer, anthology, fiction, nonfiction
Jacana Media, 172 pages
“These stories take up space; they are big and heavy and weighty and solid. These stories make no apologies. The sentences you will find on these pages are not afraid. They move from the brutal and the bloody to the melodic and the lyrical. They are crisp and controlled then suddenly they melt; sweetly, seductively.”–Sisonke Msimang

 

 

 

May
Tags: Biography, South Africa, women writers, #OwnVoices, Black women
Jacana Media, 230 pages
“This book reminds us that before 1990 conditions on the ground meant that a determined union supporter such as Ndlovu could pay with her life for being a militant organiser. The new South Africa was not won cheaply.”–William Freund, Professor Emeritus of Economic History, University of KwaZulu-Natal

 

 

 
An Image in a Mirror by Ijangolet Ogwang (@IjangoletO)

May
Tags: Women writers, Africa, South Africa, debut, Black women, #OwnVoices
Jacana Media, 200 pages
An Image in a Mirror is a richly told and deeply intimate African story about the becoming of two young women, who are, the same as much as they are different. When the sisters, at the age of twenty-two, finally cross their respective worlds to meet, how mirrored will each feel about the other?”–Description

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Literary Websites

Literary Websites

Looking for a few good books by womxn, international authors, trans/gender nonconforming writers, or other historically underrpresented populations? Take a look through some of my favorite websites for the latest in literary news, author info, and reviews.

African American Literature Book Club https://aalbc.com/

AALBC is the largest and most popular website dedicated to African American and Black Literature from around the world. We celebrate Black culture, through books, for readers of all backgrounds to enjoy.

Arab Lit https://arablit.org/

A site dedicated to Arabic literature and translation.

BookRiot https://bookriot.com/

Book Riot is dedicated to the idea that writing about books and reading should be just as diverse as books and readers are.

Electric Lit https://electricliterature.com/

Electric Literature is a nonprofit dedicated to making literature more exciting, relevant, and accessible. They are committed to publishing work that is intelligent and unpretentious, to elevating new voices, and to examining how literature and storytelling can help illuminate social justice issues.

Emily Books https://www.emilybooks.com/

Emily Books is a project that publishes, publicizes, and celebrates the best work of transgressive writers of the past, present and future.

The Free Black Women’s Library https://thefreeblackwomanslibrary.tumblr.com/

The virtual site for The Free Black Women’s Library, a mobile trading library and interactive biblio installation that features a collection of 900 books written by Black women. The library creatively uses books to build community and explore the intersections of race, class, culture and gender while creating space to center and celebrate the voices of Black women in art, film literature. This mobile library pops up monthly and mainly in unique and radical spaces throughout Brooklyn, NYC.

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/

Goodreads is the world’s largest site for readers and book recommendations. Launched in January 2007, the Goodreads mission is to help people find and share books they love.

Haymarket Books https://www.haymarketbooks.org/

Haymarket Books is a radical, independent, nonprofit book publisher based in Chicago, a project of the Center for Economic Research and Social Change.

IndieBound https://www.indiebound.org/

In Tori Lex: Judging Books Beyond the Cover http://www.intorilex.com/

Among other genres, Tori offers insightful reviews of YA, sci-fi, dystopian, and thrillers on her blog.

Johannesburg Review of Books (JRB) https://johannesburgreviewofbooks.com/

The Johannesburg Review of Books publishes reviews, essays, poetry, photographs and short fiction from South Africa, Africa and beyond.

Lambda Literary https://www.lambdaliterary.org/

The nation’s leading LGBTQ+ literary organization.

Lit CelebrAsian https://litcelebrasian.wordpress.com/

A group of bookworms and #DiverseBookBloggers dedicated to uplifting Asian voices in literature. Hosts of #AsianLitChat and #AsianLitBingo.

Literally Black http://www.literallyblack.com/

Literally Black is a review site dedicated to the exposure, and promotion of black literature–this includes but is not limited to books written by African-Americans.

Literary Everything https://literaryeverything.com/

Literary Everything is a blog that reviews books written by Nigerian authors.

Monlatable Book Reviews https://www.monlatablereviews.com/

Monica reviews an eclectic mix of fiction to spread her love of reading.

Office of the Gender and Women’s Studies Librarian https://www.library.wisc.edu/gwslibrarian/

The Gender and Women’s Studies Librarian (GWSL) at the University of Wisconsin provides topical bibliographies and resource guides, lists of feminist and LGBTQ+ publishers and bookstores, as well as one-on-one research consultations to activists, scholars, and citizens around the world.

Shelf Awareness http://www.shelf-awareness.com/

Shelf Awareness is a free e-newsletter about books and the book industry.

Trans Book Reviews https://transbookreviews.wordpress.com/

Trans Book Reviews review books featuring transgender or non-binary main characters.

Well Read Black Girl https://wellreadblackgirl.com/

Glory Edim is the founder of Well-Read Black Girl, a Brooklyn-based book club and digital platform that celebrates the uniqueness of Black literature & sisterhood. Her book club has met with several award-winning authors including Margo Jefferson, Naomi Jackson, and Angela Flournoy. Well-Read Black Girl’s mission is to increase the visibility of Black women writers and initiate meaningful conversation with readers.

WOCreads https://wocreads.wordpress.com/

Bina reviews books by women writers of Color and non-binary people of Color as well as indigenous WoC/NB PoC, at all intersections.

Women’s Review of Books https://www.wcwonline.org/Women-s-Review-of-Books/womens-review-of-books

Since 1983 the Women’s Review of Books has provided a forum for serious, informed discussion of new writing by and about women.

Women Writers, Women’s Books http://booksbywomen.org/

An online literary magazine by and about contemporary women writers from around the world. Women Writers, Women’s Books was launched in 2011 to be another platform for contemporary women writers and authors around the world writing in English.

 

What are your favorite bookish sites or blogs that feature diverse authors and titles? 

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